Caps of favourite scenes of movies/tv, quotes from books and lyrics from songs and other randomities.

 




“My local library branch started doing this “Blind Date with a Book” thing, thought you guys might like it. The shelf was full when we got there, but was like this as we were leaving. The books are wrapped in paper and have different designs on them, and then a few words vaguely describing the subject matter of the book. Things like “Drama”, “Plot Twists”, “espionage”, etc. The only thing exposed on the book is the barcode that you use to scan the book out. I thought it was a pretty cool idea.”

“My local library branch started doing this “Blind Date with a Book” thing, thought you guys might like it. The shelf was full when we got there, but was like this as we were leaving. The books are wrapped in paper and have different designs on them, and then a few words vaguely describing the subject matter of the book. Things like “Drama”, “Plot Twists”, “espionage”, etc. The only thing exposed on the book is the barcode that you use to scan the book out. I thought it was a pretty cool idea.”

amiablydebauchedsloth:

(Favourite) Age of Sail Tropes: Midshipmen




“They ‘fought like young Nelsons.’ The words of a schoolmaster, writing from aboard the Mars after the battle of Trafalgar, describing the valour of his pupils in the heat of battle.”



~Young Nelsons by  D. A. B. Ronald





Not only are midshipmen ridiculously cute, they’re fascinating characters. Seeing children involved in warfare is both horrifying and fascinating and is a way for people unfamiliar with Age of Sail life to see just how terrible it could be. These young boys leave a comfortable home life and join the Navy. They fight, they win, they loose. These are boys forced to be men before they are ready, and are often portrayed as innocent and sweet, but brave and bold.
The midshipman’s uniform changed in style throughout the years of the Age of Sail, but are made distinctive by the white collar patches. During the early 1800’s, midshipmen wore quasi-top hats but earlier they wore rather unfortunate looking bicorns. Midshipmen were normally 12 or above, but some were on ships even before then as boys or ‘younkers’. Midshipmen were different from cabin boys, as they intended to advance through the ranks and pursue a naval career as an officer.

amiablydebauchedsloth:

(Favourite) Age of Sail Tropes: Midshipmen

“They ‘fought like young Nelsons.’ The words of a schoolmaster, writing from aboard the Mars after the battle of Trafalgar, describing the valour of his pupils in the heat of battle.”

~Young Nelsons by D. A. B. Ronald

Not only are midshipmen ridiculously cute, they’re fascinating characters. Seeing children involved in warfare is both horrifying and fascinating and is a way for people unfamiliar with Age of Sail life to see just how terrible it could be. These young boys leave a comfortable home life and join the Navy. They fight, they win, they loose. These are boys forced to be men before they are ready, and are often portrayed as innocent and sweet, but brave and bold.

The midshipman’s uniform changed in style throughout the years of the Age of Sail, but are made distinctive by the white collar patches. During the early 1800’s, midshipmen wore quasi-top hats but earlier they wore rather unfortunate looking bicorns. Midshipmen were normally 12 or above, but some were on ships even before then as boys or ‘younkers’. Midshipmen were different from cabin boys, as they intended to advance through the ranks and pursue a naval career as an officer.

(Source: sopwithsloth)

hiimgiovanni:

Security camera clips that make the news usually show bad things, but Coke decided to “look at the world a little differently” in this heartwarming viral video. They found security camera footage from around the world showing happy moments: people stealing kisses instead of possessions, dealing potato chips instead of drugs, and offering car assistance rather than road rage.

Faith in humanity-restored.

sweetvisage:

Art Nouveau Doors

(Photos uncredited as I collected them on my hard-drive a long time ago!)

sosuperawesome:

How to Make a Baby by photographer Patrice Laroche and Sandra Denis, the mother of his new baby daughter Justine.